Archive for JavaScript

Caffeine updated for Pharo 7

Posted in Caffeine, consulting, Context, livecoding, Smalltalk, SqueakJS with tags , , , , , , on 29 September 2019 by Craig Latta
Pharo 7 running on the SqueakJS virtual machine in Chrome, debugged by Squeak in a DevTools panel

I’ve updated Caffeine to run Pharo 7; please try it out! There was one virtual machine bug (primitivePerformWithArguments wasn’t manipulating the stack correctly), and I had to turn off a few Pharo features (like libGit support, which uses LibC, something I haven’t faked in the virtual machine yet).

Many thanks to the Pharo hackers in the RMOD team at INRIA Lille, for hosting me at their sprint on Friday, 27 September 2019. It was great hanging out and coding with you all. We’ll get that Pharo Apple Watch screenshot soon. :)

Exploring the Netflix player with the Caffeine Chrome extension

Posted in Caffeine, consulting, Context, livecoding, music, Smalltalk, SqueakJS with tags , , , , , , , , , , on 22 September 2019 by Craig Latta
debugging Better Call Saul with Caffeine

With the latest version of the Caffeine Chrome extension, you can run Caffeine in a Chrome DevTools panel, with access to all the Chrome debugging APIs. I’ve been using it to explore the Netflix video player, for an app I’m writing that enables the viewer to edit narratives by rearranging scenes.

From a quick look at the DOM element tree for the player, it’s apparent that it’s a React app. By following a reference chain from a user interface element (like the skip-forward button), through the bound “this” object of its click-event listener, I found the internal React properties for all the player’s UI elements, and all the player functions they use (for example, for seeking forward in a video).

With those functions in hand, I made a Netflix player class in Smalltalk, which can manipulate the Netflix player React app interactively from Smalltalk code. Other objects I made representing show elements (like scenes, episodes, seasons, and series) can use my player to compile analytic information about shows, and present them in different ways. For example, you could watch an episode of Better Call Saul consisting only of scenes that include a certain character, or that take place at a certain location, or with flashbacks placed in chronological order. This is for a webapp I’m writing called Arc.

I’m eager to see what else you explore using the Caffeine extension in the DevTools!

Caffeine Chrome extension updated

Posted in Caffeine, consulting, Context, livecoding, music, Smalltalk, SqueakJS with tags , , , , , , on 18 September 2019 by Craig Latta
Caffeine running as a Chrome DevTools panel, debugging the Croquet Studios site, with Hydra graphics in the background.

I’ve updated the Caffeine Chrome extension in the Chrome Web Store. This version, 77.1, makes the entire Caffeine user interface available as a Chrome DevTools panel, and can access all of the Chrome APIs. With Hydra graphics support included, it’s the most convenient and geeky way to access Caffeine, perfect for your next Algorave. :)

The Big Shake-Out

Posted in Appsterdam, Caffeine, consulting, Context, livecoding, Naiad, Smalltalk, Spoon, SqueakJS with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 25 March 2019 by Craig Latta

Golden Retriever shaking off water

Some of those methods were there for a very long time!

I have adapted the minimization technique from the Naiad module system to Caffeine, my integration of OpenSmalltalk with the Web and Node platforms. Now, from a client Squeak, Pharo, or Cuis system in a web browser, I can make an EditHistory connection to a history server Smalltalk system, remove via garbage collection every method not run since the client was started, and imprint needed methods from the server as the client continues to run.

This is a garbage collection technique that I had previously called “Dissolve”, but I think the details are easier to explain with a different metaphor: “shaking” loose and removing everything which isn’t attached to the system through usage. This is a form of dynamic dead code elimination. The technique has two phases: “fusing” methods that must not be removed, and “shaking” loose all the others, removing them. This has a cascading effect, as the literals of removed methods without additional references are also removed, and further objects without references are removed as well.

After unfused methods and their associated objects are removed, the subsystems that provided them are effectively unloaded. For the system to use that functionality again, the methods must be reloaded. This is possible using the Naiad module system. By connecting a client system to a history server before shaking, the client can reload missing methods from the server as they are needed. For example, if the Morphic UI subsystem is shaken away, and the user then attempts to use the UI, the parts of Morphic needed by the user’s interactions are reloaded as needed.

This technology is useful for delineating subsystems that were created without regard to modularity, and creating deployable modules for them. It’s also useful for creating minimal systems suited to a specific purpose. You can fuse all the methods run by the unit tests for an app, and shake away all the others, while retaining the ability to debug and extend the system.

how it works

Whether a method is fused or not is part of the state of the virtual machine running the system, and is reset when the virtual machine starts. On system resumption, no method is fused. Each method can be told to fuse itself manually, through a primitive interface. Otherwise, methods are fused by the virtual machine as they are run. A class called Shaker knows which methods in a typical system are essential for operation. A Shaker instance can ensure those methods are fused, then shake the system.

Shaking itself invokes a variant of the normal OpenSmalltalk garbage collector. It replaces each unfused method with a special method which, when run, knows how to install the original method from a connected history server. In effect, all unfused methods are replaced by a single method.

Reinstallation of a method uses Naiad behavior history metadata, obtained by remote messaging with a history server, to reconstruct the method and put it in the proper method dictionary. The process creates any necessary prerequisites, such as classes and shared pools. No compiler is needed, because methods are constructed from previously-generated instructions; source code is merely an optional annotation.

the benefits of livecoding all the way down

I developed the virtual machine support for this feature with Bert Freudenberg‘s SqueakJS virtual machine, making heavy use of the JavaScript debugger in a web browser. I was struck by how much faster this sort of work is with a completely livecoded environment, rather than the C-based environment in which we usually develop the virtual machine. It’s similar to the power of Squeak’s virtual machine simulator. The tools, living in JavaScript, aren’t as powerful as Smalltalk-based ones, but they operate on the final Squeak virtual machine, rather than a simulation that runs much more slowly. Rebuilding the virtual machine amounts to reloading the web page in which it runs, and takes a few seconds, rather than the ordeal of a C-based build.

Much of the work here involved trial and error. How does Shaker know which methods are essential for system operation? I found out directly, by seeing where the system broke after being shaken. One can deduce some of the answer; for example, it’s obvious that the methods used by method contexts of current processes should be fused. Most of the essential methods yet to run, however, are not obvious. It was only because I had an interactive virtual machine development environment that it was feasible to restart the system and modify the virtual machine as many times as I needed (many, many times!), in a reasonable timeframe. Being able to tweak the virtual machine in real time from Smalltalk was also indispensable for debugging and feature development.

I want to thank Bert again for his work on SqueakJS. Also, many thanks to Dan Ingalls and the rest of the Lively team for creating the environment in which SqueakJS was originally built.

release schedule

I’m preparing Shaker for the next seasonal release of Caffeine, on the first 2019 solstice, 21 June 2019. I’ll make the virtual machine changes available for all OpenSmalltalk host platforms, in addition to the Web and Node platforms that Caffeine uses via the SqueakJS virtual machine. There may be alpha and beta releases before then.

If this technology sounds interesting to you, please let me know. I’m interested in use cases for testing. Thanks!

livecoding VueJS with Caffeine

Posted in Appsterdam, Caffeine, consulting, Context, Smalltalk, Spoon, SqueakJS with tags , , , , , , , on 30 August 2018 by Craig Latta

Vue component

Livecoding Vue.js with Caffeine: using a self-contained third-party Vue component compiled live from the web, no offline build step.

a tour of Caffeine

Posted in Appsterdam, consulting, Context, Smalltalk, Spoon, SqueakJS with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 27 August 2018 by Craig Latta

https://player.vimeo.com/video/286872152

Here’s a tour of the slides from a Caffeine talk I’m going to give at ESUG 2018. I hope to see you there!

Livecoding other tabs with the Chrome Remote Debugging Protocol

Posted in Appsterdam, consulting, Context, Smalltalk, SqueakJS with tags , , , , , , , on 24 July 2017 by Craig Latta

Chrome Debugging Protocol

We’ve seen how to use Caffeine to livecode the webpage in which we’re running. With its support for the Chrome Remote Debugging Protocol (CRDP), we can also use it to livecode every other page loaded in the web browser.

Some Help From the Inside

To make this work, we need to coordinate with the Chrome runtime engine. For CRDP, there are two ways of doing this. One is to communicate using a WebSocket connection; I wrote about this last year. This is useful when the CRDP client and target pages are running in two different web browsers (possibly on two different machines), but with the downside of starting the target web browser in a special way (so that it starts a conventional webserver).

The other way, possible when both the CRDP client and target pages are in the same web browser, is to use a Chrome extension. The extension can communicate with the client page over an internal port object, created by the chrome.runtime API, and expose the CRDP APIs. The web browser need not be started in a special way, it just needs to have the extension installed. I’ve published a Caffeine Helper extension, available on the Chrome Web Store. Once installed, the extension coordinates communication between Caffeine and the CRDP.

Attaching to a Tab

In Caffeine, we create a connection to the extension by creating an instance of CaffeineExtension:

CaffeineExtension new inspect

As far as Chrome is concerned, Caffeine is now a debugger, just like the built-in DevTools. (In fact, the DevTools do what they do by using the very same CRDP APIs; they’re just another JavaScript application, like Caffeine is.) Let’s open a webpage in another tab, for us to manipulate. The Google homepage makes for a familiar example. We can attach to it, from the inspector we just opened, by evaluating:

self attachToTabWithTitle: 'Google'

Changing Feelings

Now let’s change something on the page. We’ll change the text of the “I’m Feeling Lucky” button. We can get a reference to it with:

tabs onlyOne find: 'Feeling'

When we attached to the tab, the tabs instance variable of our CaffeineExtension object got an instance of ChromeTab added to it. ChromeTabs provide a unified message interface to all the CRDP APIs, also known as domains. The DOM domain has a search function, which we can use to find the “I’m Feeling Lucky” button. The CaffeineExtension>>find: method which uses that function answers a collection of search results objects. Each search result object is a proxy for a JavaScript DOM object in the Google page, an instance of the ChromeRemoteObject class.

In the picture above, you can see an inspector on a ChromeRemoteObject corresponding to the “I’m Feeling Lucky” button, an HTMLInputElement DOM object. Like the JSObjectProxies we use to communicate with JavaScript objects in our own page, ChromeRemoteObjects support normal Smalltalk messaging, making the JavaScript DOM objects in our attached page seem like local Smalltalk objects. We only need to know which messages to send. In this case, we send the messages of HTMLInputElement.

As with the JavaScript objects of our own page, instead of having to look up external documentation for messages, we can use subclasses of JSObject to document them. In this case, we can use an instance of the JSObject subclass HTMLInputElement. Its proxy instance variable will be our ChromeRemoteObject instead of a JSObjectProxy.

For the first message to our remote HTMLInputElement, we’ll change the button label text, by changing the element’s value property:

self at: #value put: 'I''m Feeling Happy'

The Potential for Dynamic Web Development

The change we made happens immediately, just as if we had done it from the Chrome DevTools console. We’re taking advantage of JavaScript’s inherent livecoding nature, from an environment which can be much more comfortable and powerful than DevTools. The form of web applications need not be static files, although that’s a convenient intermediate form for webservers to deliver. With generalized messaging connectivity to the DOM of every page in a web browser, and with other web browsers, we have a far more powerful editing medium. Web applications are dynamic media when people are using them, and they can be that way when we develop them, too.

What shall we do next?

 

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