SqueakJS changes its world with ThisWebpage

Posted in Appsterdam, consulting, Context, Naiad, Smalltalk, Spoon with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on 28 October 2016 by Craig Latta

a new platform

Since becoming a virtual-machine-based app, Smalltalk has integrated well with other operating systems, providing the illusion of a consistent unified platform. With the ascendancy of JavaScript, the common execution environment provided by web browsers is effectively another host operating system. Smalltalk runs there too now, thanks to Bert Freudenberg’s SqueakJS. So in addition to macOS, Windows, and Linux, we now have the Web host platform.

While all platforms expose some of their functionality to apps through system calls, the Web exposes much more, through its Document Object Model API (DOM). This gives Smalltalk a special opportunity to enable livecoded apps on this platform. It also means that Smalltalk can interoperate more extensively with other Web platform apps, and participate in the ecosystem of JavaScript frameworks, both as a consumer and a producer.

to JavaScript and back

The part of SqueakJS which enables this is its bidirectional JavaScript bridge. This is implemented by class JSObjectProxy, and some special support in the SqueakJS virtual machine. One may set Smalltalk variables to JavaScript objects, send messages to JavaScript objects, and provide Smalltalk block closures as callback functions to JavaScript. One may interact with any JavaScript object in the Web environment. This means we can manipulate DOM objects as any other JavaScript framework would, to create new HTML5 user interfaces and modify existing ones.

In particular, we can embed SqueakJS in a web page, and modify that web page from SqueakJS processes. It would be very useful to have a Smalltalk object model of the host web page. I have created such a thing with the new class ThisWebpage.

reaching out with ThisWebpage

I chose the name of ThisWebpage to be reminiscent of “thisContext”, the traditional Smalltalk pseudo-variable used by an expression to access its method execution context. In a similar way, expressions can use ThisWebpage to access the DOM of the hosting Web environment. One simple example is adding a button:

ThisWebpage
  createButtonLabeled: 'fullscreen'
  evaluating: [Project current fullscreen: true]

Behind the scenes, ThisWebpage is doing this:

(JS document createElement: 'input')
  at: #type
  put: 'button';
  at: #onclick:
  put: [Project current fullscreen: true]

Class JSObjectProxy creates JS, an instance of itself, during installation of the JavaScript bridge. It corresponds to the JavaScript DOM object for the current web browser window, the top of the DOM object graph. By sending createElement:, the expression is invoking one of the DOM methods. The entire set of DOM methods is well-documented online (for example, here’s the documentation for Document.createElement).

So far, ThisWebpage has some basic behavior for adding buttons and frames, and for referring to the document elements in which SqueakJS is embedded. It can also create links and synthesize clicks on them. This is an important ability, which I use in making a Squeak object memory jump from SqueakJS in a web browser to a native Cog virtual machine on the desktop (the subject of tomorrow’s post).

The possibilities here are immense. ThisWebpage is waiting for you to make it do amazing front-end things! Check it out as part of the Context 7 alpha 1 release.

 

Caffeine: live web debugging with SqueakJS

Posted in Appsterdam, consulting, Context, Naiad, Smalltalk, Spoon with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 26 October 2016 by Craig Latta

In February 2015 I spoke about Bert Freudenberg’s SqueakJS at FOSDEM. We were all intrigued with the potential of this system to change both Smalltalk and web programming. This year I’ve had some time to pursue that potential, and the results so far are pretty exciting.

SqueakJS is a Squeak virtual machine implemented with pure JavaScript. It runs in all the web browsers, and features a bi-directional JavaScript bridge. You can invoke JavaScript functions from Smalltalk code, and pass Smalltalk blocks for JavaScript code to invoke as callbacks. This lets Smalltalk programmers take advantage of the myriad JavaScript frameworks available, as well as the extensive APIs exposed by the browsers themselves.

The most familiar built-in browser behavior is for manipulating the structure of rendered webpages (the Document Object Model, or “DOM”). Equally important is behavior for manipulating the operation of the browser itself. The Chrome Debugging Protocol is a set of JavaScript APIs for controlling every aspect of a web browser, over a WebSocket. The developer tools built into the Chrome browser are implemented using these APIs, and it’s likely that other browsers will follow.

Using the JavaScript bridge and the Chrome Debugging Protocol, I have SqueakJS controlling the web browser running it. SqueakJS can get a list of all the browser’s tabs, and control the execution of each tab, just like the built-in devtools can. Now we can use Squeak’s user interface for debugging and building webpages. We can have persistent inspectors on particular DOM elements, rather than having only the REPL console of the built-in tools. We can build DOM structures as Smalltalk object graphs, complete with scripted behavior.

I am also integrating my previous WebDAV work, so that webpages are manifested as virtual filesystems, and can be manipulated with traditional text editors and other file-oriented tools. I call this a metaphorical filesystem. It extends the livecoding ability of Smalltalk and JavaScript to the proverbial “favorite text editor”.

This all comes together in a project I call Caffeine. had fun demoing it at ESUG 2016 in Prague. Video to come…

new website for Black Page Digital

Posted in Appsterdam, consulting, Context, GLASS, music, Naiad, Seaside, Smalltalk, Spoon with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 21 January 2016 by Craig Latta

I wrote a new website for Black Page Digital, my consultancy in Amsterdam and San Francisco. It features a running Squeak Smalltalk that you can use for livecoding. Please check it out, pass it on, and let me know what you think!pano

Smalltalk Reflections episode 8: garbage collection

Posted in Uncategorized on 20 January 2015 by Craig Latta

Episode 8 of Smalltalk Reflections is out. The topic is “garbage collection”.

SqueakJS WebSocket test passes; Flow, Lightning, Naiad to follow

Posted in Uncategorized on 18 January 2015 by Craig Latta

Hoi–

Well, this is perverse fun. :) The JavaScript WebSocket client API works from SqueakJS, so I guess I’ll write a WebSocket server to proxy peer-to-peer traffic between SqueakJS clients. This will let me implement the Flow external streaming “primitive” interface, using only the JavaScript bridge and no actual primitives. That will enable the Lightning remote messaging protocol, and then Naiad. I’ll run the server on try.squeak.org and any other site that wants to be a Lightning node.

***

"Test the WebSocket API with an echo server."

| report websocket |

Transcript clear.

report := [:label :data |
   Transcript
   cr;
   nextPutAll: label;
   print: data;
   endEntry].

websocket := (
   (JS Object new)
      at: #newWebSocket
      put: (JS Function new: 'return new WebSocket("ws://echo.websocket.org");');
      newWebSocket).

websocket
   at: #onopen
   put: [:event |
      report value: 'opened: ' value: event.
      websocket send: 'hey there'];
   at: #onclose
   put: [:event | report value: 'closed: ' value: event];
   at: #onmessage
   put: [:event |
      report value: 'data: ' value: event data.
      websocket close];
   at: #onerror
   put: [:event | report value: 'error: ' value: event data]

***

Context status 2015-01-16

Posted in Appsterdam, consulting, Context, Naiad, Smalltalk, Spoon with tags , , , , , , , on 16 January 2015 by Craig Latta

Hoi all–

Context is the umbrella project for Naiad (a distributed module system for all Smalltalks), Spoon (a minimal object memory that provides the starting point for Naiad), and Lightning (a remote-messaging framework which performs live serialization, used by Naiad for moving methods and other objects between systems). I intend for it to be a future release of Squeak, and a launcher and module system for all the other Smalltalks. I’m writing Context apps for cloud computing, web services, and distributed computation.

Commits b7676ba2cc and later of the Context git repo have:

  • Support for installable object memories as git submodule repos.
  • Submodule repos for memories for each of the known Smalltalk dialects, with Naiad support pre-loaded. I’m currently working on the submodules for Squeak and Pharo.
  • A web-browser-based console for launching and managing object memories.
  • A WebDAV-based virtual filesystem that enables Smalltalk to appear as a network-attached storage device, and mappings of the system to that filesystem that make Smalltalk accessible from external text editors (e.g., for editing code, managing processes and object memories).
  • Remote code and process browsers.

There’s a live discussion site and a mailing list. The newsgroup is gmane.comp.lang.smalltalk.squeak.context.

Thanks for checking it out!

Craig

Smalltalk Reflections episode 7: minimalism

Posted in Appsterdam, consulting, Context, Naiad, Smalltalk, Spoon with tags , , , , , on 14 January 2015 by Craig Latta

Episode 7 of Smalltalk Reflections is out. The topic is “minimalism”.

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